Soju

I blame it on the booze!  yep.. all the girls in my basement had this crazy talks just now, and it reminds me of the crazy stuffs my other girls did over the booze.. say what? oh yeah! it’s all due to the mighty SOJU!

I got to know Soju during those times when I spent hours and nights watching Korean dramas with my mom.  You know how curious we were about soju? We actually *somehow* figured out the etiquette of drinking soju, when they usually drink it and those kinda information.. and when a Korean market just opened in a mall nearby, we rushed there to by ramyon and soju! and we had it during our drama session! WOOT!

Soju has stood for so many Korean meanings. Some people take it as Korean vodka,  or as comparable to Japanese sake. It’s so worldly known now! =)

Once again I did some research *oh boy, how about my paper on HMV due today?! lol* Hopefully it will cover the basic things about SOJU, the bitter good of life *hahaha*

Pouring Soju
Credit to world.kbs.co.kr

The word Soju literally means “burned liquor”. It is distilled alcoholic beverage which made of rice. There are other known ingredients likesuch as wheat, barley, tapioca, or sweet potatoes.

The distilled beverage was brought into Korea in 1300s by the Mongolians, and in the 1256 Chinese invasion many distilleries were established around Kaesong area.

Now the most known historical place of Soju is located in Andong, where you can find the Andong Soju museum.

From 1965 until 1991, in order to alleviate rice shortages, the Korean government prohibited the traditional methods of distilling soju from pure grain. Soju was then made primarily through dilution by mixing pure ethanol with water and flavoring. Soju produced through dilution from ethanol is known as diluted soju, while soju produced by distillation from grain is known as distilled soju

Nowadays there are several popular brands of Soju in the market: 참 이슬 “chamisul”, 처음처럼 “cheoumcheoreom/like the first time” *love this!*, and many others. But the largest manufacturer seems to be Jinro.

You might ask, how come Soju is soooo popular in Korea? the first answer *I have to say* because it’s cheap! yep it does! Second of all, we have to remember that Korea is a highly sociable society. Drinks, like Soju *it’s cheap AND it’s a part of tradition* can serve these traits right.

It is an important part in a celebration, in business and social relationships, in breaking the ice, in teambuilding and in relaxation. When two men look into each other’s eyes, it’s either to fight or to drink soju. Koreans fighting and departing as enemies after a night of soju drinking always meet the following day and work together as if nothing happened. Soju creates not only new relationships but also strengthen the old ones.

Facts about Soju

– People usually relate Soju with rainy day or bad mood

– It does also means celebration tho =)

– Soju glasses don’t have colorful appearance but has an important secret. One bottle of soju equals seven of soju glasses. So even when two people share one bottle or three people share one bottle, there’s always one glass of soju left. That’s why people order one more bottle, which create a friendly mood between soju lovers.

– The etiquette of drinking Soju reflects friendliness. One should take and receive in pouring and sharing a glass of Soju.

– The bodily manner *hahahaha* I mean posture in pouring and recieving Soju reflects their tradition of the ‘age system’

– oh what am I saying? I think I need a glass of it now?! hahahaha *OK.. OK.. I know I have started blabbering out my random and redundant thoughts*

Anyway, you’ll get the point, right?! Just drink responsibly! and if you don’t quite like the bitter taste of the original Soju, many places has served flavoured Soju *kiwi, lemon, etc, etc, oh my favourite one is the youghurt soju!*

for more explanation please go to & credit to
http://www.trifood.com/soju.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soju
http://world.kbs.co.kr
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